• Brianna Lyman

Getting To Know A Gun

Updated: Oct 20



Liberals think guns are scary. They demand tighter gun control, going so far as to say we should ban guns altogether. 


However, there is nothing scary about responsible gun ownership and a commitment to firearm safety. Guns are not scary if treated and used with respect. 


We’re here to cover the basics for you, since the media can’t be trusted to do the same. 


How does a gun work? 


This answer varies, since it depends what type of firearm you’re using. A basic answer is ammunition is inserted into a magazine, which feeds a bullet into a chamber. When the trigger is pulled, the firing pin is released. This little firing pin strikes the bullet. Inside the bullet is gunpowder which is encased in the shelling. When the firing pin hits the bullet it triggers an explosion and forces the bullet out of the casing and out of the gun. 


What’s a Clip? 



A clip is used to hold ammunition together.


What’s a Magazine?



A Magazine can be detachable or internal. Either way, a magazine feeds bullets to the chamber. 


What is a Cartridge?



A Cartridge is the casing of the bullet. 


What is a Revolver?



Revolvers can store up to seven bullets in a revolving cylinder. Modern revolvers are considered semi-automatic weapons. When the trigger is pulled, a round is fired and the cylinder or wheel rotates a live round in line with the firing mechanism.  


What is a Semi-Automatic?


Semi’s are guns that do not use a revolving cylinder. Like most 21st century weapons, most semi-automatic handguns load cartridges from a detachable magazine located in the grip. Still, one pull of the trigger can only release one bullet, and another bullet must be chambered. 


What’s an AR-15?



Often mistaken for an “assault rifle”, “AR” stands for ArmaLite Rifle, named after the company that developed the firearm. Like other semi-automatic rifles, the AR-15 fires one bullet per pull of the trigger. The AR-15 catches a bad reputation because, like other semi’s, it can shoot bullets at a higher velocity, which can cause the bullet to ricochet in the body if it hits a bone, as compared to bolt-action rifles which usually fire rounds slower but have more blunt force. 


What’s a Bolt Action Rifle? 




This is one of the simpler types of firearms available today. This rifle requires manual pushing of the bolt forward, which chambers the bullet. This means the bullet is now in position for firing. When the trigger is pulled, it works the same as any gun, that is, the firing pin is released and hits the bullet and so on and so forth. Unlike other firearms, this rifle requires constant manual attention. Once the first bullet is fired, the shooter must pull the bolt back to release the empty cartridge and then once again forward to load a new one. 


What’s a Semi-Automatic Rifle? (You know the kind; the ones liberals want to ban) 



What separates semi’s from a bolt-action rifle is that, as indicated by the name, loading a new round is automatic. These rifles have what is known as a magazine, which can hold anywhere from 5 to 30 bullets. Once the magazine is filled, it is inserted into the rifle. The shooter does not have to stop to load the bullets individually. Still, each pull of the trigger can only shoot one bullet. Despite what leftists will have you believing, these guns pose no greater danger than any other semi-automatic weapon. It is crucial to note that the word “automatic” refers to the loading of the weapon, not the firing. Further, gun control supporters who say that semi-automatics ‘spray’ bullets are wrong, for again, only automatic weapons can do so. Automatic weapons are banned in many states and exceptionally difficult to obtain legally. 


What’s the difference between a Semi-Automatic Rifle and an Automatic Rifle? 


The biggest difference between the two is what’s known as an “open bolt” mechanism. Rarely used in semi-automatic firearms, which can only fire one bullet per pull of the trigger, the open bolt mechanism allows multiple bullets to be fired with one pull of the trigger and is often used in submachine guns. Semi-automatic guns cannot fire more than one bullet per pull of the trigger. 


What’s an “Assault Weapon”?


Logically speaking, an assault weapon is any type of instrument that can assault you. For instance, a knife, when used in the wrong context, becomes a weapon. If that knife is used to hurt someone, logic dictates it’s now an assault weapon. 


Now, if you check out the Giffords Law Center, which focuses on producing research regarding shootings and firearms, you’ll find a whole slew of misleading information about ‘assault weapons’. 

I’ll break it down for you: 


GLC says “Assault weapons are a class of semi-automatic firearm specifically designed to kill humans quickly and efficiently”. 


Wrong. 


The Facts: For starters, semi-automatic weapons are not “specifically” designed to kill humans quickly and efficiently. Semi-automatic weapons were first widely developed in the early 1900’s. They’re popular for target shooting and hunting, and can serve in self-defense. There is absolutely zero evidence to support the claim that these firearms were “specifically designed to kill humans quickly and efficiently”. In fact, Remington Arms advertised the “Remington Auto-loading Repeating Rifle”, also known as the “Model 8” as a sporting rifle, not a rifle to kill humans. Furthermore, most firearms in circulation in the United States today have been used in wars, simply because they’re easier and more accurate than bolt action style weapons. 


The term “assault weapons” is a leftist attempt to vilify an inanimate object. Assault should not be synonymous with semi-automatic. Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, and other liberals are proposing a ban on assault weapons. They can’t seem to understand why civilians would want or need a semi-automatic firearm.


Given today's growing movement to defund the police, it's clear why we need to protect our right to bear arms.





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